iPhone Photography

ongoing, color, iPhone 6s, iPhone xs

The pictures of my mobile phones are scattered, fragmented, and not very recognizable, from different time clues and different urban backgrounds. For each image, they have no extra background stories and also they don't know each other. I have been trying for a long time to find my own style of photography. When I was lost, I suspended those behaviors because I thought I just didn't want to suppress any shooting motives and desires, not even clear how those motives are produced. Those seemingly random photos are actually my momentary, conscious captures. Mobile photography is the fastest and most effective tool to achieve my desire. It has its own texture: fuzzy, and little distortion.

 

Most of my photo stories happen in the city, just like the security that is accustomed to carrying mobile phones with us. Many people have long been used to the city's billboards, noise, buildings under construction and every smell belongs to the city. The impact of modern life is a daily attack on people's senses. I like to inadvertently look for absurd images that are happening or left behind in the process of urbanization. Those natural landscapes, man-made landscapes, and all ambiguous objects are the epitome of this era, which all present potential friction between people and people, between people and the environment. So I think Infinite human traces are left in our place. When I grew up in the bustling city of Shanghai, I felt an inexplicable (strange) sense of oppression, especially when I looked up at them under the dense buildings. Those tall buildings are not only built in the city but instead, they engulf the city, that is, the sense of loss brought about by urbanization and modernization.

© Junwei Chen, 2020